Women fucking men Jackson

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I Weigh with Jameela Jamil 63 June 17, Educator, filmmaker, author, and viral Ted Talk speaker Dr. Jackson Katz s Jameela this week to discuss the language we use when discussing violence against women, bro-culture and how some men are afraid of losing social status with other men by speaking up, how vulnerability is is compatible with strength and power, how it is never too late to speak out, and what parents can do to raise caring and empathetic children. See Dr. Show Transcript. How Did This Get Played? Subscribe - RSS.

Tweet Share Download. I hope you're well. I'm good. Lots of work stuff going on, very intense. I'm doing lots of things that I never thought I would ever do. I did not have any of them on my bingo card for 35 years old. All these people that I love and admire so much, I can't believe I'm about to be in an animated film with them.

I'm going to be such a fucking nerd at that premiere. Can you imagine how much of a geek I'm going to be? I'm going to ask everyone for a selfie. I'm going to be so embarrassing and my manager's going to have to say what she said when I was at this Hollywood Reporter shoot with all these brilliant icons that I totally didn't deserve to be around.

But I think they probably needed an Indian person. So they threw me in. And she was like, can you stop pointing at people with your mouth open? And sort of officially asked me to stop being a fucking loser because I was surrounded by my heroes, but I can't help it, I just feel like Hollywood's biggest competition winner, I will never feel like I belong here. And as I've said to you many times in this podcast, fuck it, lean in to the imposter syndrome, lean into it and enjoy it, indulge in imposter syndrome.

Think about how lucky you are to not deserve to be here and yet be here anyway and then make the absolute fucking most of it. That's what I'll be doing at the premiere of this movie Super Pets, that I'm doing. Lots of other unexpected things going on at the moment. Anyway, that's enough about me.

I try not to talk about myself very much in these intros because give a fuck. Do you know what I mean? You're more interested in what I'm interested in, which is the people that I have on this podcast. And this week I have someone, so. Interesting and strong and supportive and unusual and fantastic, and it is a gentleman called Dr. Jackson Katz, he is an American educator, a filmmaker and author whose work centers on violence, media and masculinities with an added focus on media literacy. He delivered a speech, a TED talk that went completely viral, like millions and millions and millions and millions of views viral.

That was about men's violence against women. And if you haven't heard or seen or read the speech after you finished this episode of the podcast, I beg of you to do so because it is one of the most extraordinary 17 and a half minutes of your life. And having seen that speech, I asked him, it was being circulated a lot after the murder of Sarah Everard, which was a huge point of discourse across the Internet when it happened not so long ago. And so at the time, I reached out to him just to say that his speech really moved me and is something that.

I haven't just not seen a man say I haven't seen anyone speak about the violence that women face most often at the hands of men in the way that he talks about it. And so we delve further into that issue and we talk about his history, his journey towards being someone who wants to spend his life educating other men to become allies for women and explaining how toxic masculinity and patriarchy harms all of us, harms every single gender.

Women fucking men Jackson

We talk about gun violence. We talk about so many different things. And I could have talked to him for hours, I swear to God. But he's such an informative man who comes armed with statistics, with empathy, with openness, with humility and and honestly it was just a fucking at a points during the podcast, he apologized to me for just like going on and on and on and speaking on and on and on. And I was fucking thrilled because I'm exhausted having to talk about feminism and women's safety and women's rights all of the time.

It was so wonderful to have a man finally come on and do this labor for us. So please just sit back and relax and listen to this excellent episode that you should feel free to forward to any of the men in your life that you can't be fucked to educate because he will do it excellently for you. This is the wonderful Dr. Jackson Katz. Dr Jackson Katz.

Women fucking men Jackson

I'm such a big fan of yours, I'm so happy that you're here. Welcome to I Weigh. Katz: [] Thanks, Jameela, it's great to be with you. And he was also the first man to minor in women's studies at the University of Massachusetts. So therefore, I couldn't feel in safer hands than I do right now having this conversation with you. I first became aware of you upon finding your speech a couple of years ago called Violence Against Women.

Women fucking men Jackson

It's a men's issue and it's just over 17 minutes long. And I've seen it so many times because it's one of the best deliveries on the overwhelming societal issue at large around the violence that women face. And I'm even as I'm talking about this, I'm so aware of what we're about to talk about, which is the problematic wording of calling it violence against women. And that's one of the many important topics that you bring up in this speech that I'm going to link to everyone who listens to this episode.

I'll make sure to link to it on my Instagram. But can we talk about that incredible speech? That was, what, five years ago? Katz: [] Well, it was Katz: [] Yeah, I delivered it in the in the fall of twenty twelve and it went it went live online in twenty thirteen. I remember thinking even back then that this felt so modern to see a man talking about this issue so passionately and such an informed and compassionate and active manner where you actually calling for action.

And yet even I didn't know that you were. I was almost eight years late to finding that video and also that you have been doing this for decades and that there are actually a lot of people, including in particular men, who have been doing the work that you do for quite some time now.

Katz: [] One thing that I've learned from that whole experience, and I still get s and I still get people contacting me to this day who tell me that they had never heard a man say the things that I was saying. And they were a little shocked that it was several years before Me Too. And I was like, wait a second. It was not just a few years before Me Too. It's like it's like, as you said, Jameela, my my colleagues and I have been doing this kind of work, you know, engaging men, thinking critically about men's violence against women from a from the men's perspective, if you will, and engaging men with a whole range of feminist issues, to be honest with you, since the late s.

And so the idea that somehow you know, something in twenty twelve or twenty thirteen was was seen to be by many people I appreciate seem to be like cutting edge suggested to me how much work that we have to do. My colleagues and I around the world, the men who in a multiracial, multiethnic sense, who are doing this kind of work, how much we have to step up our game. And I mean, in terms of scaling up the things that we've already been doing because so many people don't even know it exists, [][ We are gastlit about it or we are immediately silenced by you can often be men's rights activists or just disgruntled men who say, you know, well, technically and statistically, more men are sexually abused.

More men are subjected to violence on the street. The world is technically unsafe for men and they use that to shut the conversation down because they have statistics at hand. And what always baffled me until I saw your speech as that no one realizes that, you know, it's not women who are inflicting all of that harm against men.

It's a minority of women inflicting that harm. It's men hurting those other men. It's men sexually assaulting those other men as well as women and children. So this is an issue that we need to talk about. You can't just shut it down by saying men are also hurt by men. That can't be our bar of where we're happy for society to exist at. Katz: [] That's right. That's right. And I often say just to use, you know, easy phrases that can be easily digestible. The same system that produces men who abuse women, produces men who abuse other men and men's violence against other men is one of the great problems and great tragedies of our species going back tens of thousands of years.

Men's violence against other men. Of course, men's violence against women is the front line of my work, but it's not one or the other, really. I'm constantly making the point that the same system, again, that produces a 19 year old guy who, you know, sexually assaulted his classmate in university or a college or university is the same after a night of partying is the same system that produced the twenty seven year old man who beats up his pregnant wife because he's freaked out that she's going to start focusing somewhere else other than him and his needs.

And so he's losing control and he acts out by aggressing against her. Is the same system that produces a thirty nine year old corporate executive who sexually harasses his colleagues or his subordinates in the workplace is the same system that produces a fifty eight year old white guy in the in the hills mountains of Utah who goes out in the woods and shoots himself in the head in response to a series of life circumstances.

They're all connected and sophisticated people make those connections.

Women fucking men Jackson

And yet so often in the discussion about men's violence against women, you will hear men say, just like you reference, oh, well, what about violence against men, as if they're not connected and they're just showing their ignorance on some level. And it's so frustrating to me because the women in the multiethnic, multiracial women's movements around the world have been talking about this and trying to point us in this direction for decades.

And yet they still get called often anti male male bashers. They have an agenda against men. And yet they're what they're doing is is so life affirming for men and boys, as well as for women and girls. If these if these ignorant men would just relax, take a deep breath, maybe read a book, maybe go to a training, go, go, go listen to people in the domestic and sexual violence field talk about the subject matter. Maybe they would see that there's actually some great compassion and insight for what's going on in men's lives as well.

So as you were just mentioning, that men say, well, what about violence against men? It's because we haven't put a protagonist at the beginning of that sentence that it's men's violence against women or men's violence against men, because we don't have that that protagonist and I don't know the correct grammatical term and about to ask you for it in a minute. But because we don't have that that that part of the sentence, they're able to sort of fob women off with that as if this is a terrible thing that's happening to women and a terrible thing that's happening to men and there is no actual perpetrator.

And so will you break that down for me and my audience, please? Katz: [] Sure. I mean, obviously, this is a critical piece of the paradigm shift or the the shift in framework that I argue needs to happen. In other words, most people continue to this day in, you know, to think about domestic and sexual violence and sexual harassment and those all those related issues.

Women fucking men Jackson

email: [email protected] - phone:(309) 158-4887 x 8035

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